Posts Tagged ‘Photography’

#35 – Bring it on home

The travel section of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (a local newspaper here in St. Louis) collects and prints photos of St. Louisans wearing St. Louis items of clothing around the world.  This blog’s photo of Lynne and Jim with the Archbishop Odama has been published with them.

Click here to view the photo and click the box next to “vote as best” to get Lynne and Doorways a little recognition!

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#34 – Safari photos

Before Lynne left, she visited a local game park and went on a little safari where she saw all kinds of animals.

water buffalo on safari

A water buffalo

giraffes at safari

Giraffes!

Elephant on safari

Look at its tusks!

The game parks are protective grounds for these animals who are constantly hunted for their tusks, hides and bodies in the wild.  It is very rare to see these animals outside a safe place like this.

#33 – Palm trees everywhere

From Lynne:

Palm trees were everywhere there.

palm treesThe deal is that the elephants love the leaves, fruit, seeds and all. They eat they eat the whole tree and distribute freely over the countryside naturally, kind of like Johnny Appleseed.  The elephants do the planting, treating and fertilizing all at once.

#32 – More photos from Uganda

Lynne is back from Uganda, but we’re finding various photos and stories to post.

350 of these children are in boarding school near the Sisters of St. Joseph (CSJ) and went to mass with us each morning.  Most people walk or bike the roads, and they are a  little difficult to navigate.

local roads with bricks in the middlePeople leave bricks and debris all over the roads.  When it rains, huge ruts form and erode, making the paths perilous for many vehicles.  You can walk or bike, or you can take a bota-bota, which is a motorcycle taxi.

driver and JoAnn on bota-bota

JoAnn on a bota-bota!

A bota-bota fits two people behind the driver, and it can be a little scary.

We’ll probably have more content coming over the next couple weeks, so keep your eyes peeled!

#27 – Life in Gulu: meals, ants and the circle of life

From Lynne:

Electricity is a luxury, here, and we eat many meals by candlelight.

place setting around table in Uganda

One of our many electricity-free meals!

The landscape is dotted with huge anthills up to 6 feet high and equally as wide.

giant anthill

A huge anthill!

At a certain time of the year they are invaded by people who like to eat them. We notice that their wings have gone from about a half an inch since we got her to a couple of inches long.

A cemetary adjoining our yard holds the remains of many of the medical workers who cared for people during the 2003 Ebola outbreak, when the case-fatality rate rose to an all-time high of 90%.

cemetery yard in Gulu

#24 – Murchison Falls

From Lynne:

We recently visited Murchison falls, which is just a bit southwest of Gulu.  We saw the Nile River again!

nile river above Murchison falls

The Nile River above Murchison Falls

At the top of Murchison Falls, the Nile forces its way through a gap in the rocks only 6 meters wide and tumbles 43 meters (140 ft)!

Murchison falls rushing

Murchison Falls in action - so loud!

The water flows westward into Lake Albert. The outlet of Lake Victoria sends around 300 cubic meters per second of water over the falls, squeezed into a gorge less than 30 ft wide.

There is a big park at the falls, and you can see more great photos here.

#23 – Life in Uganda: baby Sonja and more

From Lynne:

Baby Sonja and Lynne

This is baby Sonja. She is 7 months old and usually rides in a wrap on her mom’s back. It is common to see African women with a baby, two or three little kids and a very large load on her head. Population is a huge issue here.

Esther and Sonja together

Sonja in a sling on Esther's (her mother's) back

This was an agrarian society before all the conflict. Families grew large, took care of their land, which was passed generation to generation, and were self-sufficient. Now many people have been in the camps for safety, and when they return, others have taken up residence on the land.  Having a title or deed is completely unknown, and government officials are not knowledgeable.

busy times in Kamapala

Busy times in Kampala, the capitol of Uganda

There is no industry for jobs, and so few are used to working for someone else. This contributes to the aimlessness many experience.

Asleep on the job

Asleep on the job.

A lot of people have guns here – big ones.  The man above is a private security employee who couldn’t stay awake on the job.