Posts Tagged ‘culture’

#32 – More photos from Uganda

Lynne is back from Uganda, but we’re finding various photos and stories to post.

350 of these children are in boarding school near the Sisters of St. Joseph (CSJ) and went to mass with us each morning.  Most people walk or bike the roads, and they are a  little difficult to navigate.

local roads with bricks in the middlePeople leave bricks and debris all over the roads.  When it rains, huge ruts form and erode, making the paths perilous for many vehicles.  You can walk or bike, or you can take a bota-bota, which is a motorcycle taxi.

driver and JoAnn on bota-bota

JoAnn on a bota-bota!

A bota-bota fits two people behind the driver, and it can be a little scary.

We’ll probably have more content coming over the next couple weeks, so keep your eyes peeled!

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#30 – Meet Kakanyero Stephine

From Lynne:

Kakanyero Stephine with house in bgThis is Kakanyero Stephine, an almost-six-year-old who has wanted for most of his young life to go to school.  His home is in the background.  Daily he would report to the nursery school only to be turned away because he has no school fees.  for the rest of the day he would hang around the edges of the clinic where JoAnn works, silently watching the activity, and the next day he would try again.Kakanyero Stephine closeup

When Sister Hellen, joking with us, asked the boy in Acholi which of us he wanted to pay for his school fees so he could go to nursery school, he pointed to me.  The cost is 240,000 shillings (or $120.00 US), the cost of a splurge for dinner or a pair of nice shoes.

So today, March 11, Kakanyero started school.  He was required to bring a small straw broom and a large roll of toilet paper for his first day, which he did.

#27 – Life in Gulu: meals, ants and the circle of life

From Lynne:

Electricity is a luxury, here, and we eat many meals by candlelight.

place setting around table in Uganda

One of our many electricity-free meals!

The landscape is dotted with huge anthills up to 6 feet high and equally as wide.

giant anthill

A huge anthill!

At a certain time of the year they are invaded by people who like to eat them. We notice that their wings have gone from about a half an inch since we got her to a couple of inches long.

A cemetary adjoining our yard holds the remains of many of the medical workers who cared for people during the 2003 Ebola outbreak, when the case-fatality rate rose to an all-time high of 90%.

cemetery yard in Gulu

#25 – The Camboni sisters

From Lynne:

These are two of the Camboni sisters.  They are across the road and have been very supportive of our friends here.

Two of the Camboni sisters with Jo Ann

Left to right: Sister Cypriana, Jo Ann, Sister Agnes

They have a magnificent garden and raise rabbits, fowl, and a few acres of vegetables, bananas, citrus, etc.

Mango tree

The Camboni sisters have some beautiful mango trees!

Sister Cypriana is from Sudan. She is just learning to drive.  Sister Agnes, who is in charge of the garden and animals, is from Italy, and has been in Africa most of her adult life. She has a turkey, and  she says it is gay.

Turkey photo in the yard

A gay turkey?

She had its partner last Thanksgiving. I am being my most restrained self.

Daniel Camboni was a Verona (Italy) priest late 1800’s who evangelized much of eastern Africa. As a result, this area is mostly catholic and VERY devotional. I have been to mass many mornings, but it is in Acholi. I have been working on my abs.

#23 – Life in Uganda: baby Sonja and more

From Lynne:

Baby Sonja and Lynne

This is baby Sonja. She is 7 months old and usually rides in a wrap on her mom’s back. It is common to see African women with a baby, two or three little kids and a very large load on her head. Population is a huge issue here.

Esther and Sonja together

Sonja in a sling on Esther's (her mother's) back

This was an agrarian society before all the conflict. Families grew large, took care of their land, which was passed generation to generation, and were self-sufficient. Now many people have been in the camps for safety, and when they return, others have taken up residence on the land.  Having a title or deed is completely unknown, and government officials are not knowledgeable.

busy times in Kamapala

Busy times in Kampala, the capitol of Uganda

There is no industry for jobs, and so few are used to working for someone else. This contributes to the aimlessness many experience.

Asleep on the job

Asleep on the job.

A lot of people have guns here – big ones.  The man above is a private security employee who couldn’t stay awake on the job.

#22 – Our last day of work

From Lynne:

It was a lot of work, but Jim (my brother-in-law) and I recently wrapped up our part of the crude labor for the construction here with the Sisters of St. Joseph.

Jim and Lynne, covered in dust

Covered in dust!

Lynne Cooper sweaty and workingOn our last day at work, Jim and I gave co-workers gifts of various tools and clothing we had brought from home, as well as a snack of boiled eggs and cipati (a fried flat bread) to go with their tea. They loved the gifts!

workers posing together

All the lovely people who have been building with us

It also happened that they caught a bush rat that day and cooked it.

three workers cooking a bush ratJim has, by now, returned to the states, and I’m here for another week until I fly back on Monday, March 8.

#20 – Esther, her baby and her bag

This is Esther. Esther with Macy's bagBaby Sonja is on her back.  But most important is her shopping bag from Macy’s!