Archive for the ‘Lynne Update’ Category

Introducing ’60 at 60′

60 at 60

A year after her last journey to Africa, Lynne has joined several other friends and formed a new effort to build a maternity clinic in Gulu for the Acholi people.

Lynne turned 60 years young in 2011, and she started asking herself what she could do that would affect others’ lives in this time of economic and political volatility and uncertainty.  Her mind and heart roamed, as they often do, to Africa and the Acholi people there.  She did a little researching and discovered that for just $60,000, the Sisters of St. Joseph in Gulu could build a brand new maternity clinic to provide rest, care and education for expecting and current mothers as well as their children.  Lynne discussed it with her friends Susan Kohl and Frank Haase, who were also turning 60 in 2011.  Together they agreed that there was a nice ring to $60,000 at 60 years of age, and they decided to use the coming year to raise the money for the clinic.  Thus, 60 at 60 was born.

Click on over to 60 at 60 to follow their journey and join their efforts!

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#35 – Bring it on home

The travel section of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (a local newspaper here in St. Louis) collects and prints photos of St. Louisans wearing St. Louis items of clothing around the world.  This blog’s photo of Lynne and Jim with the Archbishop Odama has been published with them.

Click here to view the photo and click the box next to “vote as best” to get Lynne and Doorways a little recognition!

#33 – Palm trees everywhere

From Lynne:

Palm trees were everywhere there.

palm treesThe deal is that the elephants love the leaves, fruit, seeds and all. They eat they eat the whole tree and distribute freely over the countryside naturally, kind of like Johnny Appleseed.  The elephants do the planting, treating and fertilizing all at once.

#32 – More photos from Uganda

Lynne is back from Uganda, but we’re finding various photos and stories to post.

350 of these children are in boarding school near the Sisters of St. Joseph (CSJ) and went to mass with us each morning.  Most people walk or bike the roads, and they are a  little difficult to navigate.

local roads with bricks in the middlePeople leave bricks and debris all over the roads.  When it rains, huge ruts form and erode, making the paths perilous for many vehicles.  You can walk or bike, or you can take a bota-bota, which is a motorcycle taxi.

driver and JoAnn on bota-bota

JoAnn on a bota-bota!

A bota-bota fits two people behind the driver, and it can be a little scary.

We’ll probably have more content coming over the next couple weeks, so keep your eyes peeled!

#30 – Meet Kakanyero Stephine

From Lynne:

Kakanyero Stephine with house in bgThis is Kakanyero Stephine, an almost-six-year-old who has wanted for most of his young life to go to school.  His home is in the background.  Daily he would report to the nursery school only to be turned away because he has no school fees.  for the rest of the day he would hang around the edges of the clinic where JoAnn works, silently watching the activity, and the next day he would try again.Kakanyero Stephine closeup

When Sister Hellen, joking with us, asked the boy in Acholi which of us he wanted to pay for his school fees so he could go to nursery school, he pointed to me.  The cost is 240,000 shillings (or $120.00 US), the cost of a splurge for dinner or a pair of nice shoes.

So today, March 11, Kakanyero started school.  He was required to bring a small straw broom and a large roll of toilet paper for his first day, which he did.

#28 – I’m coming home!

From Lynne:

One thing I have not motioned: we have all been sick…in some cases sicker than we had ever been.  It turns out three of us had bugs and recovered in a couple of days, but of course, JoAnn, show-off that she is, has Typhoid Fever!  So, needless to say, we are not hanging around with her anymore!  🙂  She is recovering well.  The last three days we have walked into town and taken bota-botas home.

Love to all who have read and commented here. I have not kept up with the questions, but appreciate each of them. Hopefully the additional photos will compensate. It has been a wonderful trip, and I am grateful for the opportunity and for my gracious and generous hosts, the Sisters of St. Joseph.  Thanks especially to Kyle Kratky, who is the production manager for this blog, and to the staff and board of Doorways, who told me everything was going great whenever I called.

Tomorrow I come home to the states.  I will take a jeep ride to Entebbe, where I will fly to London then Chicago and on to St. Louis, and then I’m home again.

#27 – Life in Gulu: meals, ants and the circle of life

From Lynne:

Electricity is a luxury, here, and we eat many meals by candlelight.

place setting around table in Uganda

One of our many electricity-free meals!

The landscape is dotted with huge anthills up to 6 feet high and equally as wide.

giant anthill

A huge anthill!

At a certain time of the year they are invaded by people who like to eat them. We notice that their wings have gone from about a half an inch since we got her to a couple of inches long.

A cemetary adjoining our yard holds the remains of many of the medical workers who cared for people during the 2003 Ebola outbreak, when the case-fatality rate rose to an all-time high of 90%.

cemetery yard in Gulu